THE BREWSKI REPORT Tommy Brewski: My Beer. My Life.

July 30, 2010

Sam Adams’ Boston Lager Beer Review 7.30.10

Sam Adams' Boston Lager displayed in high tech drinkware.

Sam Adams' Boston Lager displayed in high tech drinkware.

The Brewski Report Reviews Sam Adams’ Boston Lager and a Good Way To Eliminate Chipmunks
File Date: 7.30.10

File Name: The Chipmunk And The Cat
The Beer: Boston Lager
Type: Vienna Lager
Serving: Draft
Stats: 4.75% ABV
Brewer: Boston Beer Co. (Samuel Adams)
Web Site: www.samueladams.com
Country of Origin: MA, USA
Brewer Info: Jim Koch founded The Boston Beer Company in 1984 because he believed that Americans deserved better beer. Today, we’re a team of about 350 people, and we all share a common passion for bringing great Samuel Adams® beers to beer lovers everywhere. We’ve worked hard for the many successes we’ve enjoyed over the years. The Boston Beer Company has been cited as one of the best companies to work for by Boston Magazine, one of the Best Entry-Level Jobs by The Princeton Review, and our beers have won more awards than any beer in history.

tbr-sa-bl-medallionBrewer Brand Hype: When Jim left his job to start a brewery, people told him he was crazy. After tasting that first batch of Samual Adams Boston Lager in his kitchen, he knew he had something that just might prove the doubters wrong. It wasn’t like any beer out there. Full flavored with hops and malt yet balanced and complex. And a beer revolution began. The incredible thing is after all these years, its still the same amazing beer and nothing else out there is quite like it.
Label: Pulled this one from the tap.

The Brewski Review: **Disclaimer: Animal lovers should NOT read this post.** That said, I’ve set a rat trap to kill the chipmunks burrowing around my house. Wisdom gained from my father. He told me this a while ago but I never really followed through until the chipmunks started burrowing through the corner of my wood porch decking. Arrrrg! The guantlet was thrown. I didn’t even bother to bait the traps, just place them in their travel path. Pow! Pow! Pow! Three in a row at one hole. Some time went by and the hole came up dry so I moved onto another. Pow! Pow! Another two. At this point, I thought about getting little chipmunk stickers with X’s through them so I could apply them to my front door – much like the WWII fighter pilots did on their planes when they had a confirmed enemy kill. My high was great until one day the trap came up missing. What the…?! In the back of my mind I made a mental note: go to store later to buy another varmit exterminator. Before that happened, my wife came home from her morning walk and said our trap was out in the street with a dead chipmunk. DANG! That must have been one bad*ss furry rodent. I figured he got his back legs trapped and he pulled himself and the trap about 60′ to the road with his front legs. I’m not sure if this was possible but that was the only explaination I could muster. Anyway, I head out to the road to retrieve the contraption and come to find out it was run over. Everything, including the chipmunk, was crushed. DRAT! About a week later my wife was chatting with the neighbor across the street and she told my wife that she watched a cat walking across the street with the chipmunk (and trap) in it’s mouth and get run over by a car. A devilish grin crossed my face when I heard this story. It was probably the same neighborhood cat that was using our flower beds as it’s litterbox. Talk about irony. Anyway, it turned out to be one very bad day for the chipmunk and the cat. But, on the bright side, my day was looking up. I would like to say I celebrated with a beer but that wasn’t the case. Had I, Sam Adams’ Boston Lager wouldn’t be that beer. Although a decent beer, it was a little hoppy for my tastes. I would drink it again if offered to me for free. I doubt I’d purchase any. Oh yeah, the moral of the story? There is no such think in life as a free lunch.

"We have met the enemy and they are ours." - U.S. naval captain Oliver Hazard Perry (1785–1819) wrote these famous words in a letter to U.S. army general William Henry Harrison (1773–1841) after defeating the British navy at the Battle of Lake Erie on September 10, 1813.

"We have met the enemy and they are ours." - U.S. naval captain Oliver Hazard Perry (1785–1819) wrote these famous words in a letter to U.S. army general William Henry Harrison (1773–1841) after defeating the British navy at the Battle of Lake Erie on September 10, 1813.

Drinkability: Okay. Would drink it again.
Appearance: Pale to medium amber.
The Buds: Kind of Hoppy for my tastes
TBR Cap Rating: 3.75 out of 5 caps.

Bell’s Brewery Oberon Ale Beer Review 7.30.10

Bell's Brewery Oberon Ale

Bell's Brewery Oberon Ale

The Brewski Report Reviews Bell’s Oberon Ale.
File Date: 7.30.10

 File Name: Scent Of Sunny On Sale Now!
The Beer: Oberon Ale
Type: American Pale Wheat Ale
Serving: Draft
Stats: 5.8% ABV
Brewer: Bell’s Brewery Inc.
Web Site: www.bellsbeer.com
Country of Origin: MI, USA
Brewer Info: Bell’s Brewery, Inc. formerly Kalamazoo Brewing Company, founded by Larry Bell as a home-brewing supply shop in 1983, sold its first beer in 1985. Originally brewing in a 15-gallon soup kettle, the company has grown remarkably. Bell’s Brewery has grown from a tiny operation renting part of a former plumbing supply warehouse to a bustling, regional craft brewery. Although the “microbrewery” revolution began on the West Coast in the 1970s, the Midwest saw this brewing development much later. Bell’s Brewery stands as the oldest craft-brewer east of Boulder, Colorado. Originally self-distributed, Larry and crew brewed, bottled and delivered all of the beer to market for the company’s first four years. By 1989, Bell’s was shipping over 500 barrels annually and assigned its first wholesaler to further establish itself across the State of Michigan. After struggling several years to produce and sell robust, full-bodied ales against a tide of a mass-market domestic beer, Bell’s began to see the demand for craft beer grow dramatically. Bell’s soon ventured outside Michigan, continuing its solid growth and developing a reputation across the Midwest for the unique style and flavor of its Bell’s brands.

tbr-oberon-sm-labelBrewer Brand Hype: An American wheat ale brewed with Saaz hops. Spicy and fruity, Oberon is the color and scent of a sunny afternoon.
Label: A short draft beer served at the bar. No labels.

The Brewski Review: I don’t really have much to say about Oberon Ale and it appears the brewer doesn’t either. Take a look at the Brewer Brand Hype noted above. ‘color and scent of a sunny afternoon’? Who wrote this uniquely undescriptive marketing tagline? Bell’s Brewery must have bartered some of their product with a local ad firm because they most certainly couldn’t have paid for this touchy, feely assembly of words. If this verbiage is printed somewhere on the label and I was fortunate enough to read it before purchasing, the limited sensitivity of my manliness would have prevented me from purchasing this beverage. The bottle would have slipped through my hand and exploded on the store floor while I stood, slackjawed and immobile at the mere thought of something so unnaturally beer-like. Who is the intended market for this brand: nuns and sweet old grandmothers between the ages of 60 and 80? Seriously, was there any vision here into gaining market share with this brand advertising? I’m just really at a loss on this. What does a sunny afternoon smell like? To me, the scent of a sunny afternoon smells like fresh cut grass in the spring, thick, muggy and humid air in the summer, a burning pile of leaves in the fall and crisp, burning notrils on a subzero and sunny winter day. What does the scent of a sunny day smell like to you? Most likely not like this beer. Oberon to drink was decent and drinkable but I guess I expected more than Bell’s was capable of delivering. Ultimately, I wouldn’t consider Oberon Ale a quintessential summertime beer if that’s what the ‘scent of a sunny afternoon’ is supposed to convey.

Drinkability: Sure. Maybe.
Appearance: Clear and medium to dark golden color.
The Buds: Good. But I expected more.
TBR Cap Rating: 3.5 out of 5.

Why couldn't the caption be 'Beer for the Blue Skies and Warm Days of Summer'? This picture is pretty darn inviting.

Why couldn't the caption be 'Beer for the Blue Skies and Warm Days of Summer'? This picture is pretty darn inviting.

July 29, 2010

George Killian’s Irish Red Beer Review 7.29.10

The Big Red One.

The Big Red One.

The Brewski Report Reviews Killians Irish Red
File Date: 7.29.2010

File Name: Sports Mans Bar Is The Ticket
The Beer: Killians Irish Red
Type: American Amber/Red Lager
Serving: Draft
Stats: 4.9% ABV
Brewer: Coors Brewery/MillerCoors
Web Site: www.georgekillians.com
Country of Origin: CO, USA
Brewer Info: [Lett’s Brewery] was a Franciscan abbey, and then an iron works – which is where it got the Mill Park name. Then my great-grandfather took it over and established the Lett family brewery in 1864. “Let’s Drink Lett’s” was a well-known advertising slogan of its day. When Mill Park Brewery finally closed in 1956, it was the last remaining independent brewery in Ireland. Why the horse on the George Killian’s label? My family has always raised horses. Before automobiles, my family used horse and dray to deliver beer. My grandfather would drive his team around the county to slake the thirst of the stout men who worked the famed barley fields of Wexford. He said horses were better than cars, because a horse could always find it’s way back from the pubs to the brewery even if its driver no longer could. George Killian’s Irish Red is very much like the popular Ruby Ale originally brewed by my great-grandfather. Unlike Ruby Ale, George Killian’s Irish Red is brewed with lager yeast, which gives it a more crisp, clean finish. (Lett’s Brewery closed in 1956 and the name George Killian was purchased by the Pelforth Brewery in France. In 1989, Coors purchased the rights to the name ‘Killians Irish Red’ from the French brewery.)

tbr-killians-neonBrewer Brand Hype: There’s an art to roasting barley: the darker the roast, the darker the beer. George Killian’s Irish Red owes it’s rich red color and flavor to the extra time and expertise it takes to make perfectly slow-roasted carmalized malt. Unlike some, we use nothing artificial to color our beer. Its exquisite ruby red hue is the true color of the malt. Surprisingly smooth. Distinctively malty. Clean. A little creamy. Flavorful, but not at all heavy. This is how drinkers characterize George Killians Irish Red.
Label: Got nothin’.tbr-killians-banner

The Brewski Review: I was drinking this draft the other night in a ‘sports’ bar. If I’ve never mentioned it before I’ll tell you that I’ve always wanted to own my own bar. But mine would be different. I’m not a sports fanatic so I started to think that it would be great to open a ‘sportsmans’ or outdoorsmans bar. I’m talking about fly and ice fishing, black powder, bow and long rifle hunting, boating, trapping, big game, guided hunts, camping, hiking, traveling to exotic locations and the people who tamed them. I picture a low light atmosphere, old b&w photos on the walls, an exotic game menu, a bartender with a tie and jacket behind the bar and a few hottie waitresses who know what a .308 is and how to field dress a deer. I’d make the bar look like it’s been part of that location for 125 years. That would be different, cool and classy.  Anyway, that’s what’ I would do. Like the idea? If you do it send me picture of your joint and I’ll post them. I could see serving a tasty beer like Killians in my place.  I was actually expecting something a little heavier but it was surprised. Since Coors only purchased the rights to use the name Killians, I wonder how different Coors version is to the original Lett family recipe?

Drinkability: Surprisinly good.
Appearance: Reddish amber color.
The Buds: Not as heavy as I expected.
TBR Cap Rating: 4.0 caps out of 5.

July 28, 2010

Michelob’s Amber Bock Beer Review 7.28.10

The Food Looks As Good As The Beer Tastes.

The Food Looks As Good As The Beer Tastes.

The Brewski Report Reviews Michelob’s Amber Bock
File Date: 7.28.2010

 File Name: Designated Driver Sleeps In His Own Bed.
The Beer: Amber Bock
Type: Bock
Serving: Draft
Stats: 5.2% ABV
Brewer: Michelob/Anheuser-Busch
Web Site: www.anheuser-busch.com
Country of Origin: MO, USA
Brewer Info: Anheuser-Busch traces its origins back to the Bavarian brewery, which was established in 1852. Eberhard Anheuser acquired the Bavarian brewery in 1860 and renamed it E. Anheuser & Co. In 1864, his son-in-law, Adolphus Busch, joined the company that would later become Anheuser-Busch. While the company’s early years were demanding, Adolphus Busch proved up to the challenge. His keen vision, bold initiative, marketing savvy and passionate commitment to quality were his legacy to those who followed, and the high standards he established have been adhered to by each succeeding generation. Today, Anheuser-Busch produces the two best-selling beers in the world, Budweiser and Bud Light, and operates 12 breweries in the United States.

tbr-amber-bock-logo1Brewer Brand Hype: Michelob AmberBock is an American-style bock beer with a rich, malty and smooth taste that is hearty and full-bodied, yet finishes cleanly. Anheuser-Busch introduced this premium-plus beer nationally in 1995. Best served with grilled, barbecued and German-style food. This dark mahogany lager has a rich nutty aroma. With a gentle hint of caramel malt sweetness, this American-style bock has a deep malty body that pours a tall head. Brewed using 100 percent malt-including dark-roasted black and caramel malts and all-imported hops
Label: Draft beer – no label.

The Brewski Review: I stopped into a small bar to have some dinner after work. It reminded me of my college drinking days: a bunch of regulars sitting up at the bar. I did spend time drinking at the local college bars, but I also liked to visit small bars where the misfits hung out: bikers, college kids, townies, old folks, music afficianados, etc.  You had it all. The bands were great and the beer was cheap (rest assured we didn’t drink anything like Michelob – that was an old man’s beer.).  Buy it by the bucket or pitcher. Pour it into plastic cups. Don’t touch anything in the restroom. If you were lucky you weren’t the nightly designated driver so you could whoop it up. It was always a challenge though not to be the driver. Usually we all met at someone’s house. After we had one or two we’d go outside to the cars. Everyone would walk to someone else’s car and then we’d argue. I probably had more than my fair share of driving assignments but that was alright. If you didn’t drive there was always a risk of not having a ride home. The driver may hook up or decide he’s had enough and just leave. So, when I did drive, I may not have been able to drink as much as I wanted. But, at least I knew where I’d be sleeping that night.

Drinkability: Sure. Would drink it again.
Appearance: Dark amber in color. Minimal head.
The Buds: Mild and malty tasting.
TBR Cap Rating: 4.0 caps out of 5.

tbr-amber-bock-banner

July 27, 2010

Australia’s Foster’s Lager Beer Review 7.27.10

Straight from the Keg - not the oil can.

Straight from the Keg - not the oil can.

The Brewski Report Reviews Foster’s Lager
File Date: 7.27.2010

File Name: Down Under Beer Ads Are Tops
The Beer: Foster’s Lager
Type: American Adjunct Lager
Serving: Draft
Stats: 5.0% ABV
Brewer: Foster’s Group Limited
Web Site: www.fostersbeer.com
Country of Origin: Australia
Brewer Info: William and Ralph Foster created Foster’s in 1887. They were so dedicated to delivering Foster’s the way it should be enjoyed, they even sold it with ice to keep Australia’s warm environment at bay. More than 120 years later, the bold, refreshing taste of Foster’s is available in more than 150 countries, making it the largest-selling Australian beer brand in the world. Foster’s 25.4 oz. cans arrived in the U.S. in 1972. They resembled motor oil cans so, naturally, Americans nicknamed them “Foster’s Oil Cans.” And the name’s stuck ever since. Truth is, we quite like it. Almost as much as we like what’s inside. Pride of Ringwood hops are only grown by Hop Products of Australia in Bushy Park, Tasmania and Oven River, Victoria and by Ellerslie Hop Estates in Myaree. And unlike other beers, they’re added at the end of the brewing process to preserve their freshness. These hops and an exclusive Foster’s yeast are what give Foster’s its bold, refreshing taste. The “secret” yeast doesn’t produce sulfer harshness that other beers can exhibit, which means that Foster’s taste is never skunky and always Australian.

fosters-labelBrewer Brand Hype: It’s bright, golden color sits beneath a creamy foam head. A moderate aroma with a full malty character. Foster’s Lager is a 5% alcohol by volume lager with a bright, golden color that delivers a refreshing beer-drinking experience with a crisp, clean hop finish.
Label: The kegs were in the cooler. The bartender wouldn’t let me in.

The Brewski Review: The great thing about Foster’s Lager is their sense of humor. Face it, the beer is just another American Adjunct Lager and is nothing super special. So, how do you make it special? Clever marketing. Great ads with a sense of humor and a company that isn’t too proud or stuffy. I can recall some of the television ads from years ago (i.e. ‘Long Distance Relationship’ – where a man and woman sit at opposite ends of a bar). Different than anything else that was out there in my opinion. Check out the print ad below and you’ll see what I mean. As far as the beer goes, it’s a session beer. Drink it in large quantities. It’s cold, crisp and suitable for a warm summer day. There is a slight hoppy finish to it as noted above. Someday, when I win the lottery, I’ll visit Autralia and drink a Foster’s down under. Maybe it’ll bring on a whole new meaning drinking it as a domestic beer vs. an import.

Drinkability: Most likely wouldn’t drink again.
Appearance: Pale straw gold color.
The Buds: Typical tasting adjunct lager.
TBR Cap Rating: 3.5 out of 5 caps.

Well, you wouldn't want a warm beer, would you?

Well, you wouldn't want a warm beer, would you?

July 24, 2010

TBR Highlights Vehicle Graphics That Scream ‘Drink Me’.

The Brewski Report Takes a Closer Look at Rolling Ads.
File Date: 7.24.10

I’m a fan of graphics – tee shirts, signs, ads, etc. I especially like auto graphics.  Vehicle wraps are creative and visually stimulating to me. A while back my brother asked me if I wanted to get into the wrap business. Mind you, this was long before it hit mainstream. I said, who’d want to put advertisements all over their car? Duh! I never even considered non-advertising graphics that could substitute for custom paint. Opportunity was knocking his knuckles on my skull and I was completely oblivious. Oh well. Here are a few rolling ads for your viewing pleasure.

Bud Lime on Sale...That is, Sail.

Bud Lime on Sale...That is, Sail.

A Streetcar Makes Me Desire Bud Lime

A Streetcar Makes Me Desire Bud Lime

They Could Have At Least Put Some Chrome Dubs On this Dry Van.

They Could Have At Least Put Some Chrome Dubs On this Dry Van.

Chick-Mobile.

Chick-Mobile.

Even If I Didn't Work For Spoetzl Brewery I'd Still Wrap My Van Like This.

Even If I Didn't Work For Spoetzl Brewery I'd Still Wrap My Van Like This.

Souther Tier Brand Graphics on an 'Eco-Friendly' Van?

Souther Tier Brand Graphics on an 'Eco-Friendly' Van?

July 20, 2010

Sam Adams’ Summer Ale Beer Review 7.20.10

Try not to focus your eyes too much. It's a terrible camera phone pic.

Try not to focus your eyes too much. It's a terrible camera phone pic.

The Brewski Report Reviews Sam Adams’ Summer Ale Beer
File Date: 7.20.10

File Name: A Link Between Skiing and Lemon You Never Knew Existed.
The Beer: Summer Ale 
Type: American Pale Wheat Ale
Serving: Bottle
Stats: 5.2% ABV
Brewer: Boston Beer Co. (Samuel Adams)
Web Site: www.samueladams.com
Country of Origin: MA, USA
Brewer Info: Jim Koch founded The Boston Beer Company in 1984 because he believed that Americans deserved better beer. Today, we’re a team of about 350 people, and we all share a common passion for bringing great Samuel Adams® beers to beer lovers everywhere. We’ve worked hard for the many successes we’ve enjoyed over the years. The Boston Beer Company has been cited as one of the best companies to work for by Boston Magazine, one of the Best Entry-Level Jobs by The Princeton Review, and our beers have won more awards than any beer in history. 

tbr-sa-summer-aleBrewer Brand Hype: Bright and citrusy, brewed with Grains of Paradise. Samuel Adams® Summer Ale is an American wheat ale. This summer seasonal uses malted wheat, lemon zest and Grains of Paradise, a rare pepper from Africa first used as a brewing spice in the 13th century, to create a crisp taste, spicy flavor and medium body. The ale fermentation imparts a background tropical fruit note reminiscent of mangos and peaches.  All of these flavors come together to create a thirst quenching, clean finishing beer perfect for those warm summer days.
Label: Wheat Ale brewed with Lemon Zest and Grains Of Paradise.

The Brewski Review: There is a faint taste of lemon. Compared to Leinenkugel’s lemon flavored Summer Shandy it pales in comparison. If your going to go all out on lemon flavor, do it right and do it big. It’s like when you first learn how to snow ski. If your going to wipe out, wipe out big.  Take down a few people with you.  This way, when the skiers on the lift look down, it won’t be ‘What an idiot.’; it’ll be ‘Dude, did you see that?!’ Anyway, it was still a respectful beverage. As far as the ‘Grains of Paradise’ go, I don’t know if I’m tasting them or not. Since I’ve never tasted this flavor before how would I know what it was that I was tasting or even if I should enjoy it? Not that you asked but here’s a little information on Sam’s Summer Ale additive: known as Aframomum melegueta, it is a species in the ginger family, Zingiberaceae. The more common name of this spice is Grains of paradise but could also be called Melegueta pepper, alligator pepper, Guinea grains or Guinea pepper. The spice is obtained from the plant’s ground seeds and it gives a pungent, peppery flavor. As noted in the photo below, it appears to resemble regular, unground pepper. Understand all this?  Now maybe you can tell me why Sam Adams would put pepper in a lemon flavored beer? I’m not a cuisine afficianado by any means, it just doesn’t seem right.  Needless to say however, this spice tastes it doesn’t appear to deter the overall taste of the beer.  Try one out and let me know if you can taste the pepper.

Drinkability: Would drink again.
Appearance: Light golden color with maximus head.
The Buds: Lemon flavor wasn’t as evident as I would have liked it.
TBR Cap Rating: 4.0 out of 5 caps.

Grains of Paradise. (No rabbits were injured in the making of this spice.)

Grains of Paradise. (No rabbits were injured in the making of this spice.)

July 17, 2010

Southern Tier’s 422 Pale Wheat Ale Beer Review 7.17.2010

Southern Tier's 422 Pale Wheat Ale

Southern Tier's 422 Pale Wheat Ale

The Brewski Report Reviews Southern Tier’s 422 Pale Wheat Ale
File Date: 7.17.10

File Name: Is ‘Green’ Beer all the rage?
The Beer: 422 Pale Wheat Ale
Type: American Pale Wheat Ale
Serving: Bottle
Stats: 5.8% ABV
Brewer: Southern Tier Brewing Co.
Web Site: www.southerntierbrewing.com
Country of Origin: NY, USA
Brewer Info:  Southern Tier Brewing Company of Lakewood, New York, has been in operation since 2002. Founders Phineas DeMink and Allen (“Skip”) Yahn started the brewery with the vision of bringing small batch brewing back to a region rich in brewing tradition. In 2002 Skip and Phin purchased the defunct Old Saddleback Brewing Co. in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. All the equipment was removed, brought back to Lakewood and set up at its new home located within the Stoneman Business Park. The Brewery began distributing regionally in February 2003. By 2005 sales covered the majority of New York State and the eastern half of Pennsylvania. In the beginning their two flagship brands were Pilsner and Mild Ale and they also brewed IPA. As it turned out the flagships were a flop and the IPA was a huge success! They next launched a line of seasonal beers which gained great success. Since the beginning, Southern Tier has experienced steady growth and after multiple expansions to keep up with demand a new building was built in 2009. The building was designed with the express purpose of brewing innovative, high quality beer for an expanding customer base.

I wonder if Southern Tier is a 'green' company. Do they use solar or wind power to brew? Or, do they use 'green' marketing to sell their brands?

I wonder if Southern Tier is a 'green' company. Do they use solar or wind power to brew? Or, do they use 'green' marketing to sell their brands?

Brewer Brand Hype:
Pour 422 Pale Wheat Ale into a pint glass, give it a long whiff and you’ll realize that this isn’t your average pale golden wheat. Preserved in its unfiltered state, 422 is a fantastic session ale in which flavors of wheat, barley and hops commingle to a refreshing and zesty conclusion. Hints of orange and sweet malts waft to the fore as a touch of bitterness contributes to a smooth finish. 422 is brewed as a tribute to preserving our precious planet and it’s environment. It is responsibly packaged with over 80% recycled consumer products and is completely recyclable. Enjoy 422 all year as to take one stride closer to an eco-friendly life.
Label: Make Everyday Earth Day

The Brewski Review: I haven’t been able to spend the quality time I need to finish our den. Most everything is done. The floors where a pistol to complete. The sand paper kept gumming up with shellac so I had to scrap the entire floor off with a paint scraper prior to sanding. That wasn’t a pleasant task I can assure you. Overall the floors turned out nice. There was one small area that used to house an electrical outlet (in the floor – probably for a window AC unit) which needed patched. To do the job I purchased a Dremel Multimax. There are other versions of the same tool. Fein, Rockwell, Rigid, Craftsman, etc. but I selected the Multimax because of the price – $99. Others were $109 and $119. Fein was a model I would have liked to have purchased but I would have had to miss a car payment in order to afford it.  The only downside to the Dremel was that it seems to be a light-duty version more akin to a hobby tool vs. an industrial use power tool. Still, it did the job. I’m sure I’ll find other uses for it around the house in the years to come. Check out the pictures of the nearly completed room. Maybe when it’s all done I’ll celebrate. Would I do so with a 422 Pale Wheat Ale?  Sure. Why not. It’s a crisp and mild, well balanced beer. I don’t know how the ‘green’ or Earth Day connection comes into play or even what the reference to the name 422 relates to but don’t let that deter you.   

Drinkability: Would drink it again.
Appearance: Pale gold color with plenty ‘o head.
The Buds: Decent beverage. Nice mild balance.
TBR Cap Rating: 3.75 out of 5.

The Dremel Multimax in Hand.

The Dremel Multimax in Hand.

The Multimax Kit

The Multimax Kit

July 10, 2010

Miller Chill Beer Girls

Filed under: Beer Girls,Miller Brewing Co. — Tags: , , , , — Tommy Brewski @ 8:13 pm

The Brewski Report, in a totally serious review, highlights the best part of Miller Chill – the Chill Girls.
File Date: 7.10.10

What's the best way to disguise an average beer? Have one of these ladies serve it.

What's the best way to disguise an average beer? Have one of these ladies serve it.

Ahem....your shirt popped open there....wait, let me take care of that for you...

Ahem....your shirt popped open there....wait, let me take care of that for you...

No No No. This marketing strategy is all wrong. Chill is a summer beer. These girls should be on the beach.

No No No. This marketing strategy is all wrong. Chill is a summer beer. These girls should be on the beach.

July 4, 2010

Rogue Ale’s Juniper Pale Ale Beer Review 7.4.10

Pssst! Juniper Berries Are The Secret Ingredient.

Pssst! Juniper Berries Are The Secret Ingredient.

The Brewski Report Reviews Rogue’s Juniper Pale Ale
File Date: 7.4.2010

 File Name: With friends like this…(insert joke here).
The Beer: Juniper Pale Ale
Type: Herbed/Spice
Serving: Bottle
Stats: 5.3% ABV
Brewer: Rogue Ales Brewery/Oregon Brewing Co.
Web Site: www.rogue.com
Country of Origin: OR, USA
Brewer Info: Construction began in June of 1988 in Ashland along a very scenic little stream called Lithia Creek. The first brews were Amber and Gold. The Brewery and Pub opened in October 1988. While the Brew Pub was located in a very pretty and scenic location, had a beautiful deck and enjoyed moderate success and the beer was great, Ashland was not to be Rogue’s only adventure. Ashland was basically land locked, and frankly we were losing our butts in Ashland, trying to sell our hand-crafted ales. In early February of 1989, Jack wandered to Newport in search of the perfect place for another Rogue Pub. Legend has it that a terrible and unusual snow storm struck and Jack found himself stranded on the Historic Bay Front, with no way up the hill. He was forced to walk the streets until he met up with Mohave Neimi, founder of the famous Mo’s Clam Chowder. She took him to the original Mo’s restaurant, gave him a bowl of hot clam chowder and told him about her dream of living above a Bar and how she might just have the perfect spot for the next Rogue Brew Pub. Mo offered the vacant space and the garage to Jack at a very generous price, under two stipulations: that a picture of Mo herself, naked in a bath tub, be forever displayed at the Pub (it’s still there today just to the left of the Bar) and that Rogue “feed the fisherman”, meaning that we give back to the local community. This building was known as the Front & Case Bldg. The Pub opened in May of 1989, with a small but enthusiastic customer base, made up of curious locals who dropped by to see what was going on and never left. Many joined in and helped with the construction and other projects as needed. The names of many of these early customers have been immortalized with brass plaques that grace the bar today. So begins the story of Rogue Ales, enjoy!

Brewer Brand Hype: The Turkey was named the official bird of the rogueRogue Nation in August 2007. To commemorate the momentous occasion, Rogue Juniper Pale Ale was dedicated to “the turkey in each of us.” An axe and the dedication have been added to the serigraphed 22oz bottle and Juniper Pale Ale tap stickers. The Pilgrims were ale drinkers and most likely enjoyed beer at the first Thanksgiving. Juniper Pale Ale, like all Rogue products preserves water by using more ingredients, contains no chemicals, additives or preservatives and uses Free Range Coastal Water. A pale ale, saffron in color with a smooth malt balance, floral aroma with a dry spicy finish from whole juniper berries.
Label: Ale Brewed with Juniper Berries.

The Brewski Review: Brewed with Juniper berries? I really couldn’t detect the subtle flavor of the Juniper berries but it was a good beer. I would have thought this beer would have been clear but alas, it was a rather cloudy, deep gold color. I noticed a medium bitterness with a slight aftertaste. It is a crisp beer. Maybe this comes from the Free Range Coastal Water? What? Is there any other type of coastal water other than free range? What kind of marketing hype is this? Aside from a decent tasting beer, I’m reluctant to buy this marketing hyperbole. Which reminds me of a recent call from an old friend that was left on my work phone the other day. We had attended the same elementary and high school together but haven’t spoken since a reunion a few years back. I wasn’t in the office to take the call (go figure, I was out of town) but when I did retrieve the message I wasn’t so quick to return the call. His ultimate reason for the call was to sell a service to our company. A couple days passed and he calls again. This time I picked up the phone. We exchanged the usual ‘been a long time’ banter and reminisced about a few stories. He said he tried to look me up on Facebook but couldn’t find me (not my bag). At the end he said that his phone number was in the book if I wanted to call him and meet up for a drink some time. The likelihood that I’ll call him is rather slim. Actually, I can trace back my untrusting nature in people to this very one individual. Who needs a shrink? When I was about 8 or 9 years old I received a cassette player from my parents at Christmas. It wasn’t a week old when this friend asked that he borrow it. Okay. I was hesitant but I let it go. He returns it broken, with superglue fingerprints all over the top in a very sloppy attempt at repair. When I humbly asked what happened he litterally raised his voice, got in my face and said ‘What? It’s fixed isn’t it?’ Talk about a bummer. There have been other instances since then but this one point in time undoubtedly laid an unplumb foundation in my life.  

Drinkability: Decent beverage.
Appearance: Cloudy golden straw color.
The Buds: Malty tasting.
TBR Cap Rating: 3.75 out of 5.

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